Night of Broken Glass and the New York Times

THE NEW YORK TIMES reported the events of Kristallnacht, The Night of Broken Glass 74 years ago on November 11, 1938. The lives of German and Austrian Jews were forever changed. After two days of rioting and terror, 1000 synagogues were burned, 7,000 Jewish businesses were destroyed, 96 Jews were killed and hundreds injured. Approximately 30,000 Jewish men and boys were deported to concentration camps. The cost of the destruction was 5 million marks approximately 1 million dollars. To make matters worse, the Nazis forced the Jews to pay for all of the damages. It is very interesting to note that the reports by the New York Times and other news venues were read by millions, somehow the events of November 9 and 10, 1938 failed to resonate with civilized people inside and outside of Germany. Newspaper journalism and reporting in the first third of the 20th century was state-of-the-art, “the news traveled fast.” Would there be a difference between print media in the 30s and contemporary social media today? The horrible atrocities elicited no call-to-action. American luminaries such as, Henry Ford and Charles Lindbergh (also New York Times headliners) were more than happy to align themselves with Hitler, the Nazis and anti-Semitism. Unfortunately The Night of Broken Glass is timeless and remains a night of recurring silence.

2 Responses to “Night of Broken Glass and the New York Times”


  1. 1 Michael Carter April 19, 2013 at 5:39 pm

    Powerful image and article. Thank you Martin.


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